PEOPLE not PROPERTY… zero tolerance for trafficking

human-trafficking-sale

Every year, hundreds of thousands of women and children are abducted, deceived, seduced, or sold into forced prostitution. According to a book by Siddharth Kara, Sex Trafficking: the Business of Modern Slavery, they are coerced to service hundreds if not thousands of men before being discarded. “These trafficked sex slaves form the backbone of one of the world’s most profitable illicit enterprises and generate huge profits for their exploiters”. (image from theinspirationroom.com) 

Kara, the first Fellow on Human Trafficking with the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University compares the trafficking of humans to the trafficking of drugs and observes poignantly that “unlike narcotics, which must be grown, harvested, refined, and packaged, sex slaves require no such ‘processing’, and can be repeatedly ‘consumed'”.

According to the US Department of State, The modern re-emergence (“re-emergence” because modern-day trafficking of mostly women and girls is being compared to the trans-Atlantic slave-trade from Africa to the Americas) of trafficking in human beings is said to be linked to the deepening interconnection among countries in the global economy, overpopulation – with its consequent production of so called “disposable people” – and the economic and other vulnerabilities of the victims.

Around the world, millions of people are living in bondage. They labor in fields and factories under brutal employers who threaten them with violence if they try to escape. They work in homes for families that keep them virtually imprisoned. They are forced to work as prostitutes or to beg in the streets, fearful of the consequences if they fail to earn their daily quota. They are women, men, and children of all ages, and they are often held far from home with no money, no connections, and no way to ask for help.

This is modern slavery, a crime that spans the globe, providing ruthless employers with an endless supply of people to abuse for financial gain. Human trafficking is a crime with many victims: not only those who are trafficked, but also the families they leave behind, some of whom never see their loved ones again. Trafficking has a broad global impact as well. It weakens legitimate economies, fuels violence, threatens public health and safety, shatters families, and shreds the social fabric that is necessary for progress. And it is an affront to our basic values and our fundamental belief that all people everywhere deserve to live and work in safety and dignity.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, U.S. State Department Trafficking in Persons Report, 2009

What exacerbates the trade is the vicious cycle which is comprised of failing third world government infrastructure and resources to police the remote corners of their lands, while traffickers, motivated by profits, have nothing standing in the way of them and poor young women and children in rural areas. Most traffic victims are nabbed from their home villages in rural areas in developing countries around the world where regulation, policing and prosecution are more theory than practice. Poverty and lack of education is rampant, and lives are easily won and lost.

In China, the nation’s “one child” population control policy has led to a disproportionate number of boys being born to families who often aborted female fetuses if they could. Now, women are trafficked in from neighboring Burma, Mongolia, Vietnam, Laos and North Korea and sold to Chinese families. These women are often drugged and abused on the way there, after being tricked into traveling with the promise of a better life, an education or a job. Then find themselves alone in a foreign land, without papers or a passport, virtually prisoner to their “owners”: men who have paid a trafficker for their wives. See:(http://www1.voanews.com/english/news/asia/Trafficking-in-Foreign-Women-Rises-in-China-97858749.html). 

Sadly, even in South Africa during the euphoria of the World Cup games, some studies estimate that about 100,000 people may fall prey to human trafficking schemes, according to newamericamedia.org (http://newamericamedia.org/2010/07/sex-trafficking—big-business-during-the-world-cup.php). Most of them will be women and children. Some will be taken to South Africa to be sold as prostitutes. Others will be abducted and trafficked in their own land using a variety of schemes by ever-ingenious traffickers including posing as photographers looking for models to men posing as soccer camp organizers. “They’ll go up to a group of kids and say, ‘Oh, I see you’re playing soccer, would you like to go to a soccer camp?’ There may be a few games that come out of it, but it’s all a plan to later abduct them and force children into sex slavery,” says Danielle Schneider, a lifelong teacher who trains instructors who work with underprivileged kids near Cape Town, South Africa. During the 2006 Word Cup in Germany an estimated 40,000 women were trafficked into that country, according to the “2010 Stop Human Trafficking” campaign.

Salvation Army/Leo Burnet campaign to end trafficking

This year, the Salvation Army in South Africa worked with Leo Burnett to highlight the harsh realities of human trafficking. They developed a hard hitting idea that put children on sale in fashion boutique windows. The message emphasizes the tragedy of putting a price tag on human life. The text: “Human trafficking is a serious crime. Help us end the exploitation”.

 Closer to home, in Ocala, FL, three people were charged with human trafficking dozens of victims from Haiti in 2008, (http://www.ocala.com/article/20100706/ARTICLES/100709817/1402/NEWS?Title=Three-charged-with-human-trafficking-on-Alachua-County-farms); and just recently the BBC produced a multi-part series on human trafficking in the UK, perpetuated often by diplomats with immunity from criminal charges. Staff from the Saudi Arabian and Nigerian missions have been suspected of human trafficking and sexual assault. (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/london/10436729.stm).

UNODC anti human-trafficking image

 Now the UN has embarked on a campaign to raise awareness regarding human trafficking and “modern-day slavery”.

Raising awareness about human trafficking is the aim of a new campaign by the United Nations. The victims are extremely likely to be women and children. In order to tackle the problem more effectively, the UN has published figures documenting this modern slavery. In Europe, it is thought that 70,000 new victims arrive each year and stay on average for two years. The figure is half the total estimated number of 140,000. The vast majority are brought over for prostitution – in a market worth 2.4 billion euros a year. (www.euronews.net). See: (http://www.euronews.net/2010/07/02/un-targets-human-trafficking-for-prostitution/).

Victims are mostly women and children who endure heart-wrenching circumstances, under sub-human conditions for the sole purpose of enriching their traffickers and satiating a perverse need harbored by their subjugators. Tragically, women traffic and enslave other women and girls in greater numbers than can be believed. Many victims of human trafficking are nabbed at a young age and are forced into servitude, whether physical or sexual labor, for as many years as they can bear it. In the end they are either discarded as trash or used to their deaths, without a voice, rights or any representation. Most are too frightened in a foreign land to reach out to any civilian or even local authorities for help.

The UNODC is the only UN agency that focuses on the criminal justice element of the crime of trafficking. It is there mission to capture and prosecute the organizers and perpetuators of kid-napping and human trafficking which is defined as “the acquisition of people by improper means such as force, fraud or deception, with the aim of exploiting them.” (UNODC).

As members of society, we should focus on the moral and humane aspect of this crime. Zero tolerance is how we should view global trafficking.

“Virtually every country in the world is affected by these crimes. The challenge for all countries, rich and poor, is to target the criminals who exploit desperate people and to protect and assist victims of trafficking and smuggled migrants, many of whom endure unimaginable hardships in their bid for a better life.”

 http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/human-trafficking/index.html

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